Art and Electronic Media

Critical Writing
Language: 
Year: 
2009
ISBN: 
978-0714847825
Page Numbers: 
304
License: 
All Rights reserved
Record Status: 
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Abstract (in English): 

Art and Electronic Media is part of the Themes and Movements series published by Phaidon Press. This book demonstrates the formidable history of artistic uses of electronic media, a history that parallels the growing pervasiveness of technology in all facets of life. Over 200 artists and institutions from more than 30 countries are represented. The centrality of artists as theorists and critics is reflected in the focus on artists’ writings. The goal is to enable the rich genealogy of art and electronic media to be understood and seen – literally and figuratively – as central to the histories of art and visual culture.

Like other volumes in the Themes and Movements series, the book is divided into three main sections: Survey, Works, and Documents. The richly illustrated Survey provides an overview of the field beginning in the early 20th century and focusing on the period from the 1950s to the present. The Works section includes nearly 200 additional color plates with extensive, descriptive captions. The Documents section consists of theoretical writings, primarily by artists, that played an important role in defining various electronic art practices.

The book investigates the field of electronic adn digital art through the following themes:

Motion, Duration, Illumination
Coded Form and Electronic Production
Charged Environments
Networks, Surveillance, Culture Jamming
Bodies, Surrogates, Emergent Systems
Simulations and Simulacra
Exhibitions, Institutions, Communities, Collaborations

(Source: Publication website)

Critical writing that references this:

Teaching Resource using this Critical Writing:

Resource Teaching Resource Type Author Year
Digital Genres: Digital Art, Electronic Literature, and Computer Games (DIKULT 103, Spring 2013) Syllabus Leonardo L. Flores, Elisabeth Nesheim 2013
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Elisabeth Nesheim