afternoon, a story

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Afternoon was first shown to the public as a demonstration of the hypertext authoring system Storyspace, announced in 1987 at the first Association for Computing Machinery Hypertext conference in a paper by Michael Joyce and Jay David Bolter.[1] In 1990, it was published on diskette and distributed in the same form by Eastgate Systems.

The hypertext fiction tells the story of Peter, a recently divorced man who one morning witnessed a deadly car crash where he believes his ex-wife and son were involved. He cannot stop blaming himself as he walked away from the accident without helping the injured people. A recurring sentence throughout the story "I want to say I may have seen my son die this morning" where [I want to say] is one of many lexias built into a loop which causes the reader to revisit the same lexia throughout the story. The hypertext centers around the car accident, but also reveals the multifarious ways of the characters' mutual promiscuity.

Critical writing that references this work:

Title Author Yearsort descending
Three-Dimensional Dementia: Hypertext Fiction and the Aesthetics of Forgetting Carolyn Guertin 1999
Hyperfiction – ein neues Genre? Beat Suter, Michael Böhler 1999
The Disturbing Liveliness of Machines: Rethinking the Body in Hypertext Theory and Fiction Christopher Keep 1999
Piecing Together and Tearing Apart: Finding the Story in afternoon Jill Walker Rettberg 1999
Towards the Recognition of the Shell as an Integral Part of the Digital Text Anja Rau 1999
Cyberspace, Virtuality and the Text Marie-Laure Ryan 1999
Hyperfiktion und interaktive Narration Beat Suter 2000
Digital Literature: From Text to Hypertext and Beyond Raine Koskimaa 2000
Do You Think You're Part of This? Digital Texts and the Second Person Address Jill Walker Rettberg 2000
Wreader's Digest - How To Appreciate Hyperfiction Anja Rau 2001
Digital Poetics: The Making of E-Poetries Loss Pequeño Glazier 2001
Card Shark and Thespis: Exotic Tools for Hypertext Narrative Mark Bernstein 2001
Formalisation d’un modèle fonctionnel de communication à l’aide des technologies numériques appliqué à la création poétique Philippe Bootz 2001
Don't Believe the Hype: Rereading Michael Joyce's Afternoon and Twelve Blue Anthony Enns 2001
Discourse Timer: Towards Temporally Dynamic Texts Markku Eskelinen, Raine Koskimaa 2001
Internet Hyperfiction: Can it ever Become a Widely Popular Artform? Nikolaj Jensen 2001
Storyspace 1 Mark Bernstein 2002
Editing the Interface: Textual Studies and First Generation Digital Objects Matthew G. Kirschenbaum 2002
The End of Books--Or Books Without End: Reading Interactive Narratives J. Yellowlees Douglas 2003
Fiction and Interaction: How Clicking a Mouse Can Make You Part of a Fictional World Jill Walker Rettberg 2003
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Jill Walker Rettberg